Weekly What – Week 14

Well my spring break did not go exactly as planned, but things rarely do. I will do my best to throw a few riddles up, but things are mentally slow at the moment. Anyways, here’s a riddle to guess if you can!

Two in front, two beside,
Two connect right behind.
Snakes that wrap around real tight:
Two without a viper bite.

So gentle and loving,
Amazing and sublime;
Snakes of antiquity:
Benevolent and kind.

Venom of an odd, odd type;
Difficult, even, to describe.
As if one’s heart was jumped inside,
After saying, “hello” or bidding, “goodbye.”

Lost in a Blizzard

No, I haven’t died or anything. I’ve simply been focusing my energies on school, which requires an immense amount of energy. Spring break is coming, and I will do my best to catch up on riddles. Besides that, I figured I needed to post something. I was digging around some of my old poetry and found this treasure! It’s one of the first poems I ever wrote, I hope you enjoy it:

Wind howled through the trees;
tearing, biting, breaking me.
Storms of pain and suffering
Left a wasteland lost in grief.

As the storm began to settle;
Slowly, gently, little by little;
The gears stopped their grinding metal;
Silence came with gentle rebuttal.

Falling slowly from the sky,
Stars that twinkled in twilight
Covered the sorrowful, ugly sights;
Point by point they covered my life.

Not all at once, so suddenly,
Was the wreckage covered quickly;
But steadily, gracefully, gradually,
The snowflakes hid all misery.

Every speck of hope from above
Was sent to cover the ugly muck.
I say a prayer of thanks to God
For the snow I love so much.

Weekly What – Week 13

My lucky number 13 (no, I’m not superstitious)! Anyways! Creating riddles is a lot tougher than you might think. The more I wrote, the more I find this to be true. Finding an object or subject that inspires you to write a riddle about it is usually the hardest part. I found another one here and I’m hoping it isn’t redundant (I just can’t remember if I’ve written about it before). Well, here it goes!

An oak and a willow were planted close together. 
Each sprouted and grew in the heat of summer. 
The oak stood taller, the willow rooted deeper;
Both were content while they were next together.

Then came the storm with all its windy weather, 
Pushing the two trees, bending them further. 
The oak cried out as his trunk began to splinter, 
But the willow held the oak without any faulter.

The two can still be seen just about anywhere. 
Even in trying times, they stand without a waver. 
If I am the oak, then who are you, there? 
Don’t think too hard, it’s not all that clever. 

Road-Trip Throwback

PAN_RJS3810.jpg

This is a panoramic that I snagged on my way back from a wedding in Eagle, Alaska. The wedding was amazing! It was two friends I’ve known for some time that were getting married. Pictures are the threads that hold my memories together. Even one memorable picture ties to hundreds of thousands of wonderful memories. Every memory with every friend is something I treasure.

Weekly What – Week 12

And here is the other riddle! Again, this is a referential riddle. If you understand the reference, the riddle is trivial to solve.

Seed of iron in the ground, 
Cast by hearts of evil ice, 
Grows with speed at the sound 
Of songs of Lion’s new life.

Gleaming light in the night, 
A strange and wonderful world, 
Shine forth into snowy white, 
As a beacon to sails unfurled.

Creatures of the dark
Walk under the starry sky.
Only landmark seen afar
Is the spot where you shine.

Weekly What – Week 11

I’m still a couple weeks behind in the Weekly What’s, so I’ll be posting a couple more riddles back-to-back here. Both of these are what I term “referential riddles” because they are difficult to solve without some knowledge of the subjects they reference. This is a common property of all riddles, but most riddles rely on contextually common knowledge instead of more targeted referential knowledge.
These next few riddles fall into the referential riddle category, but they are not impossible to solve without knowledge of the specific references. So, without further ado, here is the riddle:

Battleships go to war;
Many sink into the depths. 
Submarines, nuclear, 
Send fear up our spines and backs.

Look under the waves and foamy spray.
Can you see the bottomless bay? 
The lost city lies in disarray;
Drain the waters and oceans away!
Set free the victims of the day;
Don’t keep the child enslaved!

Weekly What? Week 10 Revision

After my Test Group A was unable to precisely solve this riddle, I have revisioned this riddle and reissued it to Test Groups A and issued it to Group B as well.

A child sits in his chair, 
Patiently waiting for food. 
Once he gets his meal there, 
He picks up his mighty spoon.

He takes a bite or two, 
Though seems a bit distracted.
It is not but very soon
His hunger’s redirected.

With bare hands he digs in;
Molding mountains and lakes. 
A house, a valley, a rocket ship:
All, out of food, he makes.

The rocket’s trajectory, 
The house’s foundation, 
The tectonics factory, 
All begin as a notion.

The rocket launches up! 
A man comes from the house. 
The rivers flow backwards. 
Facts and physics are oust.

With spoon in hand, again, 
He devours all his meal. 
Later, he ponders what he made, 
Dreaming to make it real.

Here is a riddle for only you;
Of answers, there are but three:
Who is the boy, what is his food, 
And what has he found while eating?