Weekly What? Week 8

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A picture of Pioneer Peak from the Butte

Another year has come and gone. My memory isn’t all that great, so I only remember things that really stood out to me; those moments most likely included friends or family. The best memories are those we share with others.
I thank God, my Savior, for every single memory, for helping me through thick and thin, for guiding me through the dark and the light, for His wonderful creation and amazing plans, and for who He is: The epitome of true Love.

Here’s this week’s riddle (if you follow me on Instagram, you already have the answer):

A dark night, broken by light,
Booming sounds, and firelight.
Cheerful voices sing on high,
Praises to my Jesus Christ.

Back, I look, upon the path
We’ve traveled from the distant past;
Each day moves by so blinding fast;
People and places, I wish, to last.

But now we must see it set;
The clouds and sky are all alit.
This day is done, another yet;
Keep moving forward, never quit.

Stay safe this 2016, and keep moving forward. Live your life for Christ and never give up.

If I take the wings of the morning,
And dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea,
Even there Your hand shall lead me,
And Your right hand shall hold me.
If I say, “Surely the darkness shall fallfnon me,”
Even the night shall be light about me;
Indeed, the darkness shall not hide from You,
But the night shines as the day;
The darkness and the light are both alike to You.
Psalm 139:9-12

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Summer in Alaska

Summer hike... Alaska style...

Summer hike… Alaska style…

There’s nothing like going for a hike in the summer! Of course, if you go hiking in Alaska, be careful that you don’t go to the wrong place and end up waist deep in snow.

Tread, the Littlest Snowman

We made a snowman named “Tread.” A chipper little fellow!

Tread the Dead Littlest Snowman

Unfortunately… Tread didn’t last long.

The Mourning of Tread

We mourned his passing…

Tread the Great:
A snowman of wonder!
Faced the fate
Of snowmen in summer.

On a hike
In a seeming winter,
Tread did die
By the heat of summer!

Oh Tread! You blockhead!
Why didn’t you listen?!
Oh Tread! Now you’re dead!
Just water on pavement.

So Tread left this world,
An inspiration to all…
To put more salt on the road,
So you won’t slip and fall.

Snowman

I stand all alone,
In silence and sorrow;
In bitter, dark cold,
I wait for tomorrow.

Never do I move,
Not now, nor evermore;
Night’s rest does not sooth;
No. Darkness I deplore.

Knowing soon I’ll die,
Keenly watching, waiting;
Keeping track of time,
Kevlar can’t protect me.

Solemnly I see,
Spring and summer coming;
Snow will start to flee,
So my life starts melting.

Poems and riddles are actually very similar once you think about it. The symbolism and meaning in a poem can relate ideas about things in ways we may not think of. I appreciate the inherent structure in poetry; it forces a limitation of imagination and creativity into a mold that helps to make the ideas coherent and intelligible. You do not need to explicitly declare what you are talking about in poetry, which can make it a riddle.

There, that’s my two cents about poetry.

Waiting for Old Winter

The voices of the breeze,
Whisper its threats;
The trees speak back,
With creakings and cracks.

Old Winter comes slowly,
At a crawl it seems;
I wait for him patiently,
He and his family.

Frost is here already,
Snow is with Winter;
Rain hasn’t left yet,
And Cold is getting bitter.

The trees and breeze,
Discuss Old Winter;
They wait for him patiently,
Hoping he’ll come quicker.

(Yes. If you’re wondering if I’m ready for winter, the answer is, yes.)